State of sustainable development 2019 report published

6.5.2019 10.11

Published in English on 9.5.2019 at 16.25
State of sustainable development 2019 report published

The state of sustainable development in Finland is followed by using ten monitoring baskets for sustainable development. This is the first comprehensive review, to be conducted every four years, of where Finland stands in the implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Based on the monitoring results, the key challenges for Finland relate to biodiversity and overuse of natural resources, while our particular strengths lie in social structures, including a low level of corruption.

The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development was adopted at the UN Summit on Sustainable Development in New York in 2015. It set out 17 Sustainable Development Goals and 169 targets for the whole world. One of the instruments Finland uses to implement this Agenda for Sustainable Development is the Society’s Commitment to Sustainable Development. The eight objectives included in the Commitments are concerned with all of the 17 SDGs. Finland wants to make decisions that support the achievement of the national and global objectives for sustainable development. The monitoring system in support of decision-making is composed of indicators and expert analyses based on these on the state of sustainable development in Finland. These analyses, or interpretations, have been divided into ten equally valuable sets of topics called the monitoring baskets, which are presented on the following pages. This is also the information on which this report is mainly based.

Studies have identified Finland’s high-quality education system, the high standard of expertise based on it, and the stability of social systems in general as our key strengths in terms of sustainable development. The main challenges are concerned with overuse of natural resources and ways to combat climate chance. This report tells about the state of sustainable development in Finland in 2019. It is mainly based on information derived from the monitoring indicators from 2018 and 2017, and it is built around the ten monitoring baskets.

This report is part of the four-year monitoring cycle established by the Government Report in 2017.